Complaint: 17/353

Radio

Details

Complainants
advertisers
Original Bach Flower Remedies
Year
2017
Media
Radio
Product
Health and Beauty
Clauses
Decision
No Grounds to Proceed
ASA Links
Website Listing
Decision Document

Document

2017_35300.png

COMPLAINT NUMBER 17/353

COMPLAINANT T. Elenio

ADVERTISER Original Bach Flower Remedies

ADVERTISEMENT Radio

DATE OF MEETING 9 October 2017

OUTCOME No Grounds to Proceed


Advertisement: The radio advertisement for Rescue Remedy referred to stressful situations like passing exams or missing a flight and said that the product was traditionally used for support through stress. The advertisement said Rescue Remedy was looking for New Zealand's most stressful moment and every 50th entry would win a $100 Prezzy Card. Terms and conditions applied. People could enter and vote at the product's website.

The Chair ruled there were no grounds for the complaint to proceed.

Complainant, T. Elenio, said: A radio advertisement for rescue remedy, a stress and anxiety over the counter medication. Played on ZM at 5.20pm. That ad requested individuals to write in and tell them what their most stressful moment was to be into a $100 Prezzy card.

I don't believe a competition should be made let alone promoted to profit of people feeling

desperate enough in their stress or anxiety they have tried an over the counter medication.

The relevant provisions were Therapeutic and Health Advertising Code - Principle 1, Principle 2

The Chair noted the Complainant's concern about the radio advertisement promoting a competition and chances to win Prezzy Cards by relating their most stressful moment.

The Chair agreed that stress and anxiety were matters to be taken seriously and could

impact on people's health and wellbeing.

However, in the advertisement before her, the Chair said the advertisement was an open invitation to consumers to talk about a stressful moment which many people experience with no significant impact, regardless of whether they were users of the product being advertised. The Chair said the Prezzy Card prizes appeared to relate to the number of entries in the competition, not to the type of stressful experience a person had had.

While not an ideal association given the possible health impact of stress, the Chair said the advertisement had been prepared with the required standard of social responsibility and was not misleading. The Chair said the advertisement was not in breach of Principles 1 and 2 of the Therapeutic and Health Advertising Code.

Accordingly, the Chair ruled there were no grounds for the complaint to proceed.


Chai r' s Ruling: Complaint No Grounds to Proceed