Complaint: 17/451

Digital Marketing

Details

Complainants
A. Smith
advertisers
New Zealand Police
Year
2018
Media
Digital Marketing
Television
Product
Services
Clauses
Decision
No Grounds to Proceed
ASA Links
Website Listing
Decision Document

Document





COMPLAINT NUMBER
17/451
COMPLAINANT
A. Smith
ADVERTISER
NZ Police
ADVERTISEMENT
Digital Marketing
DATE OF MEETING
18 December 2017
OUTCOME
No Grounds to Proceed


Advertisement:
The New Zealand Police "Do you care enough to be a cop?" recruitment
television advertisement showed Police Officers running through various situations,
including a SWAT team situation, helping an elderly man cross a road and one Officer
running into the open door of a van parked in a driveway and another sliding over the
bonnet of a car. The advertisement said "we want New Zealand to be the safest country in
the world but we can't do it without your help."

The Chair ruled there were no grounds for the complaint to proceed.

Complainant, A. Smith, said:
"During the film a vehicle is seen parked on the footpath. This
is at 1:06 and 2:01 minutes into the film. In the second instance a pedestrian is forced to
walk into the road to avoid the parked car. Clause 6.14 of the Land Transport (Road Users)
Rule 2004, states:- Parking on footpaths or cycle paths. 1) A driver or person in charge of a
vehicle must not stop, stand, or park the vehicle on a footpath or on a cycle path."

The relevant provisions were Code of Ethics - Basic Principle 4 and Rule 12.

The Chair noted the Complainant's concerns the advertisement showed cars parked on a
footpath on two occasions which was in breach of Land Transport Rules.

The Chair acknowledged that, while not ideal, the scenes were a fleeting part of the overall
advertisement. The Chair noted one scene showed a car in a driveway, not parked on the
footpath. The other was parked in a shopping area. The Chair took into account the
advertisement had an overall lighthearted tone and the actions of the Officers in rolling over
the bonnet of the car were hyperbolic in nature.

The Chair's view was that the advertisement was not promoting parking on the footpath as
an appropriate behaviour and it was unlikely to encourage a disregard for safety. The Chair
said the advertisement did not reach the threshold to breach the Code of Ethics.

Chair's Ruling: Complaint No Grounds to Proceed